26 April, 2006

I was going to write this in-depth post about Anzac Day (yes, it is a national holiday, like Memorial Day in the US) and what it's all about. But a good friend has just gone into labour and I am her birth partner so I'm off to play doula. Which I have never done before. Am excited and daunted. Wish me (and her) lots of luck.

But before I go, the Anzac biscuit recipe:

1 cup rolled oats
1 cup plain flour
1 cup sugar (DON'T forget the sugar)
1 cup desiccated coconut
125g butter
2 tbsp golden syrup
1/2 tsp bicarb soda
1 tbsp boiling water

Set oven to 150C.
Mix oats, flour, sugar and coconut together. Don't forget the sugar.
Melt the butter and golden syrup.
Mix the bicarb soda with the water and add to the butter/syrup mix.
Add to the dry ingredients.
Place a teaspoon of mixture on a greased baking tray. Allow room for spreading.
Bake for about 20 minutes or until they're golden brown.
After taking them out, loosen them while warm and let cool on the tray.
Makes about 35.

Meh, I'm still waiting on the phone call to go and assist the birth - seems nothing is happening right now...

ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The best place to find out about the ANZAC tradition is here. And if you can get your hands on the movie Gallipoli (has Mel Gibson in it), watch it. Is one of the best movies my school ever forced me to watch. Basically, on Anzac Day, we remember those who fought for Australia (and New Zealand) from WW1 onwards. The dawn service commemorates the time of day, on 25 April, 1915 that troops came ashore at Gallipoli, Turkey. The service is often very moving, particularly when you hear lines like these:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.
(part of The Ode, which is often read out on Anzac Day)

Those heroes that shed their blood
And lost their lives...
You are now living in the soil of a friendly country,
Therefore rest in peace.
There is no difference between the Johnnies
And the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side
Here in this country of ours...
You, the mothers,
Who sent their sons from faraway countries
Wipe away your tears;
Your sons are now lying in our bosom
And are in peace.
After having lost their lives on this land
They have become our sons as well.
A speech that Ataturk (who founded the Turkish republic) said in 1934.

5 Comments:

Blogger Wendy A said...

Thanks for that. I think. sign...sniffle..sniffle

8:21 pm  
Blogger Abandoned in Pasadena said...

Thanks for the info about Anzac Day and the recipe.

If you don't have children Tanya, you're in for a treat. Enjoy helping your friend give birth...it's quite a miracle you'll be witness too.

1:09 am  
Blogger Barbara said...

good luck helping your friend. I'm excited for you!

1:38 am  
Blogger Carmen said...

You'll have to explain the Anzac biscuit thing to me. Maybe it's like vegemite. I didn't like them too much when I visited. Then, maybe the FORGOT THE SUGAR. :)

5:02 am  
Blogger Val said...

Gee, just ONE teaspoon on the tray? Might take a bit of time to get all 35 baked! Just kidding.

What an experience to help out at a birth. How lucky you are. I wish everyone involved well!

9:55 am  

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